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June 2019

Tagos Leadership Academy

Congratulations to our 2019 graduates!!! The TAGOS community is so proud of you and your accomplishments. 11 students graduated last week. We are very proud of our graduates and wish them great success in their future. The last thirteen years of education have ideally provided each of our graduates with the skills, abilities, and attitudes to become productive members of our society. Thank you for all of your support.

Congratulations Kallisty Adkins on accepting the TAGOS Leadership Academy scholarship at the graduation ceremony.


As you read through the last issue of the 2018-19 TAGOS newsletter, take a minute to look over the progress we made with our School Improvement Plan goals. We did not meet all of our goals, but we did make progress. We are dedicated to preparing our students to graduate college, career, and life ready.

We are actively recruiting community and business leaders to help support our programs and students. These partnerships will open even more doors to our future scholars. If you know of someone or a company who would be open to working with our students, please forward this newsletter to them.

We look back on this year with pride as we have made great strides forward and look to the future with even greater anticipation for what’s to come!

Thank you for the time and effort you put into your child’s education. Please reach out to me if you have any questions and/or concerns. I hope you all have a safe, relaxing, and fun filled summer with your families. See you in the fall!!

Sincerely, Patty Hernandez.


Business, Industry, and Community Leaders WANTED!

  • Offer real-world Connection
  • Get involved in student projects, including sitting in on their presentations
  • Share your passion, interests, and career/company with students

Contact phernandez@janesville.k12.wi.us for more information


Click the link below to find out about informative and exciting events happening this summer, through Janesville Mobilizing for Change. http://jm4c.org/events/


Worms for the Win

A PBL Passion Project at TAGOS Leadership Academy

 

Marianne McGuire’s advisory, did a teacher led project, that involved worms and leftover vegetables for composting. This project was also a great way, to coach the PBL process with the students, and teach them how to use HEADRUSH, our project tracking software program.

Click the link to find out the whole story.

https://medium.com/pbl-passion-projects/worms-for-the-win-5c610bdb93a1


2018-19 School Improvement Plan Results

Baseline - Spring 2018 Data 2018 - 2019 SIP Goal Mid- Year February 2019 Data End of Year June 2019 Data Exceeded, Met or did not meet goal
73% of all students are at/above grade level lexile band 75% at/above grade level lexile band 70% of the students are at/above grade level lexile band 80% of the students are at/above grade-level lexile band Exceeded Goal
18% of the students are at/above Pathway to Proficiency 24% at/above Pathways to Proficiency 22% of the students are at/above Pathways to Proficiency  20% of the students are at/above Pathways to Proficiency  Did not meet goal
36% of the students were absent 9-19 days  26% absent 9-19 days  22% of the students were absent 9-19 days  44% of the students were absent 9-19 days  Did not meet goal
21% of the students were absent 20 or more days  11% absent 20 or more days  5% of the students were absent 20 or more days  16% of the students were absent 20 or more days  Did not meet goal

In addition, to the SIP scores, over 50% of our students showed growth in math. In addition, we saw growth in our teacher seminars, ALEKS program, and Achieve3000. Even though we did not meet our absenteeism goal, we did improve by five percent. We are moving in the right direction, one student at a time.


Important Dates

  • Summer School dates June 17-July 12. Time 8:30-11:00
  • No school July 4th &5th
  • Office staff return on August 6th
  • Parent/Student Conferences September 3– 6, Advisory will call to schedule appointment
  • Boot Camp for NEW students, only September 3-4
  • All students return on September 5th
  • Picture Day September 11th

Supplies Needed for Success at TAGOS are the Following:

  • 3 Spiral Notebooks (2 for Math 1 for English)
  • Pens/Pencils
  • 1”- 1 ½” Binders (4-6)
  • Loose Leaf Paper
  • Colored Pencils
  • Markers/Highlighting Markers
  • Glue Sticks
  • Post-it Notes
  • Scissors
  • Texas Instruments TI-34 Calculator or other Scientific Calculator
  • Hand Sanitizer
  • 1-3 Boxes Kleenex
  • 1-3 Containers of Disinfectant Wipes

Contact Information

1350 N. Parker Dr. Janesville, WI 608-290-0468

Principal: Patty Hernandez / 743-5059 /phernandez@janesville.k12.wi.us

Dean of Students: Stephanie Davis /289-0293 / sldavis@janesville.k12.wi.us

Social Studies Advisor Kim Helgestad / khelgestad@janesville.k12.wi.us

Math Advisor Eric Skrzypchak / eskrzypchak@janesville.k12.wi.us

Special Education Advisor Marianne McGuire / mmcguire@janesville.k12.wi.us

Administrative Assistant: Valerie Maxon ./ 290-0468 / vmaxon@janesville.k12.wi.us

Educational Support Melissa Aegerter / maegerter@janesville.k12.wi.us

Educational Support Annie Showers-Curtis / anne.showerscurtis@janesville.k12.wi.us

Student Service Specialist Heidi McGraw  / hmcgraw@janesville.k12.wi.us


Bus Tokens

TAGOS Leadership Academy has bus tokens for students to purchase. The tokens are .75 each, and can be purchased at the front desk, at 2:30pm. They are sold in amounts of ten tokens per purchase. If you have questions, please call, Valerie Maxon

March 2019

Tagos Leadership Academy

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Inside this Issue

  • IS PBL Right for you?

  • TAGOS Writers/Robotics

  • How to be More Productive Student

  • Decatur Dairy Fundraiser Information

  • Contact Information

 

Important Dates

  • March 19th Governance Board Meeting 6:00-7:00

  • March 29th No School Teacher Work Day

  • April 3rd Teen Job Fair

  • April 9th Health Care Day

  • April 11th and 12th No School Staff Charter School Conference

  • April 15th-19th Spring Break

Principal’s Message

Principal’s Message by Patty Hernandez Wow, it’s March! Time is moving so quickly. Seniors and talking about graduation requirements. Juniors just finished taking the ACT. Our enrollment is up to 71 students. In the last couple of weeks I’ve taking time to reflect on the work we have been doing. In reflecting, I found myself looking over the October newsletter and re-reading the school improvement plan goals and what I wrote to you. I shared the following with you: “These goals are so important to our school, our students, our families, and our staff. Please take the time to talk to your child about the academic progress they are making in regards to these three goals.” Over the past six months our students have been given the opportunity to further develop their reading, writing and math skills, while deepening their knowledge and understanding of the world around them through studying and discussing current events and developing their projects through the project process. I am happy to report that we have seen improvement in the achievement of our SIP goals; however, we have not reached our target just yet. The STAR assessment and attendance data is in and this is our mid-year status on our SIP goals: Baseline - Spring 2018 Data Mid-Year February 2019 Data Change 73% at/above grade level lexile band 70% at/above grade level lexile band -3 18% at/above Pathway to Proficiency in math 22% at/above Pathway to Proficiency in math +4 36% absent 9-19 days 21% absent 20+ days 22% absent 9-19 days 5% absent 20+ days +14 +16

The strength of our school is in the relationships with the students, staff, and our school families. Our school and its accomplishments are a direct reflection of our work with each of your students. Our pledge to you is to continue to work toward providing engaged and empowered instruction that drives our students to be college, career and life ready. Sincerely, Patty Hernandez

Is PBL Right for You? Stephanie Davis

Curious if Project Based Learning is right for your child? You may have heard the term project based learning or PBL, but you may not know what it looks like in practice. TAGOS uses a PBL model because we want students to have authentic, real world learning experiences and voice and choice over their learning. It is our mission to build relationships in order to motivate students to grow academically so they can succeed as mindful members of their community. Project based learning is the vehicle we use to get there. If you would like to learn more about PBL, read the following excerpt from Getting Smart, What Parents Need to Know about Project Based Learning by Breanna Reynolds, a teacher at THINK Global Schools. What Parents Need to Know about Project Based Learning As a parent, you’ve probably heard the buzz about “project-based learning,” but you might not know exactly what it means. Or, more significantly, why you should care about it when it comes to your child’s education. You were your child’s first and most important teacher in life. So what is all this project-based learning hype about and why are so many schools starting to implement it? Project-based learning (PBL) is a practice that takes a learning-by doing approach wherein students are active participants in their own educational development. In a PBL classroom, you often find students solving problems, participating in simulations, conducting case studies and designing research projects based on different areas of inquiry. This method encourages students to investigate real world issues and develop practical solutions in order to inspire change at the local and global levels. Strong PBL practice requires a multidisciplinary approach, where educators collaborate to support differentiated skill building and sustained inquiry, further developing individual student voice and choice. “If traditional education is classical, PBL is jazz.

21st-century educationalists champion this method mainly because it cultivates the curiosity of students. And why is that important? For starters, psychologists have found that “curious people report finding a greater sense of meaning in life.” Secondly, research shows that curious, intrinsically-motivated students become deep learners who master complex subjects, and who develop a sense of “fascination with the subject, a sense of its relevance to life and the world, a sense of accomplishment in mastering it, and a sense of calling to it.” Read the full article here.

TAGOS Writers Report-Annie Showers-Curtis

Update on Nature Writing In Nature Writing this month, we are reading and dissecting narrative essays about nature. We are using the methods and template in The Norton Sampler, Seventh Edition Narrative Essay chapter to examine essays such as “Northern Lights” by Sigurd Olson, “The Death of a Moth” by Annie Dillard, “Some Thoughts on the Common Toad” by George Orwell, and others. Midway through our narrative section, students will begin pre-writing on their own nature-themed narrative essays. Update on Creative Writing This semester in Creative Writing, our main focus is our publication of student writing that we hope to print at the end of this school year. In our publication, we will include various types of student writing which we’ve worked on throughout the year. This includes poetry, fiction, and multimedia writing pieces. This month in particular in seminar, we will be focusing on multimedia writing. This will include found poetry, collage writing, shape poetry, and writing with illustrations. One reason for this artistic focus (other than to have fun) is to show students that there is power both in the words that they write and in the presentation of those words. To find out more about the publication, feel free to email me with the subject line “TAGOS Creative Writing Publication” at: anne.showerscurtis@janesville.k12.wi.us

Robotics: By Eric Skrzypchak

Students have started working on building their own robot. They are designing, constructing, and programming their robots to do different tasks or challenges. We are meeting Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursdays after school from 3:00 PM - 4:30 PM. Students are earning credit as well for the time that they are putting in for designing, constructing, and programming their robots. If you have an interest in any of this, come and talk with Eric Skrzypchak.

7 Strategies to be a More Productive Student

Productivity is important to do well in school. There are specific strategies that can help students be more productive in their work. With ongoing practice, the following 7 strategies can help students achieve more success on their project work. 1. Engage in “deep work”--Focus without distraction on demanding tasks. 2. The “retreating deadline”--Adjust the deadlines of assignments to be due earlier than what is actually assigned. 3. Know your biological clock--Figure out which part of the day makes you most productive. 4. Listen to classical music--Classical music puts your brain into a heightened state; making you more perceptive to information. 5. Hack into your motivation--imagine yourself being productive and your brain will release positive work chemicals. 6. Zen” your workspace--Mess creates stress. A well organized work space helps you be more productive. 7. Habitualized yourself--Set routines by doing specific activities at a specific time of day. This will help get you into the mood to participate in that activity daily. Being a productive student can lead to school success. Spend time with people who challenge you, motivate you to do more, and become a better version of yourself. It will pay off! For more information feel free to click on this link to the article. 7 Productivity Strategies Every Student Needs to Know

 

New Fundraiser

March 4th—March 22 All order forms should be turned no later than Friday March 22nd. For information, please contact Valerie Maxon 608-290-0468 vmaxon@janesvile.k12.wi.us

Brick $5.00 Co-Jack $5.00 Colby Longhorn $5.00 Farmers $5.00 Muenster $5.00 Cheddar $6.00 Havarti $6.00 Havarti Dill $6.00 Havarti Pepper $6.00 Jalapeno Muen- $6.00 Curds Muenster White $6.00 Cheddar Yellow $6.00 Dill $6.00 Buffalo $6.00 Ranch $6.00 Colby Swiss $7.00 Swiss $7.00 Settler Swiss $7.00


 

Community Leaders WANTED!!

  • Offer Real-World Connection

  • Get involved in student projects, including sitting in on their presentations

  • Share your passion, interests, and career/company with students

  • Contact phernandez@janesville.k12.wi.us for more info

 

Bus Tokens

TAGOS Leadership Academy has bus tokens for students to purchase. The tokens are .75 each, and can be purchased at the front desk, at 2:30pm. They are sold in amounts of ten tokens per purchase. If you have questions, please call, Valerie Maxon 608-290-0468.

 

Contact Information

1350 N. Parker Dr. Janesville, WI

608-290-0468

Principal:

Patty Hernandez 743-5059

phernandez@janesville.k12.wi.us

Dean of Students:

Stephanie Davis 289-0293

sldavis@janesville.k12.wi.us

Social Studies Advisor

Kim Helgestad

khelgestad@janesville.k12.wi.us

Math Advisor

Eric Skrzypchak

eskrzypchak@janesville.k12.wi.us

Special Education Advisor

Marianne McGuire

mmcguire@janesville.k12.wi.us

Educational Support

Melissa Aegerter

maegerter@janesville.k12.wi.us

Annie Showers-Curtis

anne.showerscurtis@janesville.k12.wi.us

Student Service Specialist

Heidi McGraw

hmcgraw@janesville.k12.wi.us

Administrative Assistant:

Valerie Maxon 290-0468

vmaxon@janesville.k12.wi.us

February 2019

Tagos Leadership Academy

Facebook

Twitter

Inside this Issue

  • Math and Reality Check Day

  • Writing

  • Counselor’s Corner

  • Flapjack Fundraiser Information

  • Contact Information

  • Busing Information

 

Important Dates

  • 2/9 Flapjack Fundraiser Serving from 8-10 am

  • 2/20 ACT Testing Juniors Only no school all other students

  • 2/21 WorkKeys Testing Juniors Only no school all other students

  • 3/6 No School Student Led Conferences 4-7 PM

  • 3/7 No School Student Led Conferences 4-7 PM

  • 3/8 No School

  • 3/9 No School

 

 

Notes from the Dean of Students  

What’s in a Name?

ac·ro·nym /ˈakrəˌnim/ noun 1. an abbreviation formed from the initial letters of other words and pronounced as a word (e.g. ASCII, NASA ). Acronyms are all around us. ZIP Code: Zone Improvement Plan Code, GIF: Graphics Interchange Format, NERF: Non Expandable Recreational Foam, EPCOT: Experimental Prototype Community of Tomorrow...you get the idea. Typically the acronym gets used so often that people forget that it is an acronym at all. Did you know that TAGOS is actually an acronym for Tailoring Academics to Guide Our Students? When TAGOS was created, the founders envisioned a school that would use project based learning to create an environment that allowed students to show what they know in a way that showcases their strengths while building on their weaknesses. They knew then that the one size fits all model of education did not truly fit all students. That is why we “tailor” education to fit individual students because we know that no two students are alike. Their interests and passions differ as much as their abilities in different subject areas. That is why project based learning is great. It allows a group of students to study the same topic in a teacher led project, but they are able to show what they know in a differentiated way that allows them to highlight their strengths. Project based learning also works well for student led projects where students are each working on different topics that they are passionate about. The possibilities are endless. There is no question that when students have choice and voice over what they are learning they are more engaged in their education. Families choose TAGOS because they want something different and that is why we are Tailoring Academics to Guide Our Students at TAGOS Leadership Academy!


 

Helping Teens with Time Management by Marianne McGuire

Do you find that you struggle with getting your teen to complete all of his or her responsibilities? Time management is a skill that many teens struggle with. Those teens who are in tune to their needs and expectations can self monitor their sense of time and make adjustments as needed. Kids that are more uncertain about their needs and expectations have a more difficult time keeping organized, meeting deadlines, planning ahead and establishing routines. The following article explains the advantages of having strong time management skills and the strategies parents can use to help their teens stay on task. By using these simple strategies parents will find that their teens are more productive and less stressed when it comes to getting things done.

How to Teach Time Management Skills to Teens


 

Math for 2018-2019 by Eric Skrzypchak

If you have been confused on how to understand the Aleks progress report weekly emails, I have good news. An explanation was shared with you through Infinite Campus on how to read and maneuver through Aleks and look at the reports. In case you missed it, here is a link to the explanation. Hopefully, this helps to explain some of the things you can look for and how to navigate through Aleks. Please let me or your son/daughters advisor know if you have any questions or concerns about their math. Just a reminder that your son/daughter(s) need to be working for a minimum of 45 minutes and mastering 4-6 topics per day. This is three hours and 16-24 topics for the week.

 

Reality Check Day: All Juniors and Seniors

 

Reality Check Day is an interactive, hands-on financial literacy event offered by Educators Credit Union and each participating high school, which we will be participating in at Parker High School with only the other charter schools. Reality Check Days start after students choose a career they would like to have in the future. They are then assigned a marital status, one or more children, a monthly salary, pets and a credit score. At the event, students make financial decisions that will impact their family for one month. They are required to go from station to station and work with volunteers to make choices and pay for housing, day care, utilities, food, clothing, etc. that fit within their budget. There are also opportunities for unexpected positive and negative financial impacts. Contact Eric Skrzypchak at TAGOS Leadership Academy or Victor Frasher at Educators

 

TAGOS Writers Report by Annie Showers-Curtis

Providing monthly updates on the student writers of TAGOS Leadership Academy

Update on Nature Writing

In second semester Nature Writing, we will be finishing up our poetry unit and moving into our narrative essay unit. During this unit, students will read essays by authors such as Annie Dillard, Virginia Woolf, George Orwell, Sigurd Olson, and others. In seminar, we will read, discuss, and dissect each essay, do some connected writing prompts, and end the unit by writing our own nature-themed narratives.

Update on Creative Writing

Second semester Creative Writing will focus on writing activities, workshops, and our student publication. Our activities will include some old Creative Writing Club favorites like found poetry and story prompts. The workshops this semester will serve as a time for students to come together and revise their writing to turn a good piece into a great piece by asking each other questions and offering suggestions. This year, Creative Writing is putting out a publication of student work. In order to do this, students will be writing in various forms, creating visual art, peer reviewing each other’s work, making decisions about what to include in the publication, participating in fundraising events, and helping me to put together and design the finished product. A limited number of copies will be printed toward the end of the year and will be available at TAGOS. To find out more about the publication, feel free to email me with the subject line “TAGOS Creative Writing Publication” at anne.showerscurtis@janesville.k12.wi.us


 

Counselor’s Corner by Heidi McGraw

Re·sil·ience 1. the capacity to recover quickly from difficulties; toughness. "the often remarkable resilience of so many British institutions" 2. the ability of a substance or object to spring back into shape; elasticity. "nylon is excellent in wearability and resilience"

According to psychologist Edith Grotberg, Ph.D. she believes that everyone needs reminders of the strengths they have. She urges people to cultivate resilience by thinking along three lines:  I Have: strong relationships, structure, rules at home, role models; these are external supports that are provided; I Am: a person who has hope and faith, cares about others, is proud of myself; these are inner strengths that can be developed;  I Can: communicate, solve problems, gauge the temperament of others, seek good relationships— all interpersonal and problem-solving skills that are acquired. Please talk with your student about the ways to cultivate resilience in everyday situations! The Art of Resilience


 

Community Leaders WANTED!!

  • Offer Real-World Connection

  • Get involved in student projects, including sitting in on their presentations

  • Share your passion, interests, and career/company with students

  • Contact phernandez@janesville.k12.wi.us for more info

 

Bus Tokens

TAGOS Leadership Academy has bus tokens for students to purchase. The tokens are .75 each, and can be purchased at the front desk, at 2:30pm. They are sold in amounts of ten tokens per purchase. If you have questions, please call, Valerie Maxon 608-290-0468.

 

Contact Information

1350 N. Parker Dr. Janesville, WI

608-290-0468

Principal:

Patty Hernandez 743-5059

phernandez@janesville.k12.wi.us

Dean of Students:

Stephanie Davis 289-0293

sldavis@janesville.k12.wi.us

Social Studies Advisor

Kim Helgestad

khelgestad@janesville.k12.wi.us

Math Advisor

Eric Skrzypchak

eskrzypchak@janesville.k12.wi.us

Special Education Advisor

Marianne McGuire

mmcguire@janesville.k12.wi.us

Educational Support

Melissa Aegerter

maegerter@janesville.k12.wi.us

Annie Showers-Curtis

anne.showerscurtis@janesville.k12.wi.us

Student Service Specialist

Heidi McGraw

hmcgraw@janesville.k12.wi.us

Administrative Assistant:

Valerie Maxon 290-0468

vmaxon@janesville.k12.wi.us

December 2018

Tagos Leadership Academy

Facebook    Twitter

Inside this Issue

  • Teens and Time Management & Math
  • English Seminars
  • Counselor’s Corner
  • Attendance Policy
  • Holiday Spirit Week
  • Contact Information

 Important Dates

  • 12/18 Military Presentation
  • 12/18 No Governance Board Meeting
  • 12/21 Last Day of School
  • 1/02 School Resumes
  • 1/15 6 pm Governance Board meeting
  • 1/17 End of Semester
  • 1/18 No School Teacher Work Day
  • 1/21 No School MLK Day

Notes from the Dean of Students

Why PBL? By Stephanie Davis

There is a growing number of teachers and employers who believe that today’s youth are not prepared for careers after high school.  Traditional education of the past where the teacher stood in front of the class and lectured while the students took notes does not adequately prepare students for today’s jobs where they will have to communicate well, work as a team, and problem solve. These skills do not come from lectures, nor do they come from Google searches or communicating with friends via text. That is why schools across the country are transforming the way they reach students. Students are in need of hands on, authentic learning that will allow them to apply what they have learned in the real world. That’s is where Project Based Learning comes in.

“PBL can be an effective way to cultivate a ‘need to know’ attitude in students--students are motivated to deepen their understanding in order to solve a problem that is meaningful to them. Concepts are better understood when students see a need for their use because that need encourages them to apply what the are learning to relevant situations” (Terada). We use a PBL model to motivate our students to dig deep and find meaning in their education. PBL teaches students the executive functioning and real world life skills that are necessary in post-secondary settings. We focus on communication and teamwork through our teacher led projects to ensure our graduates are ready to face whatever life beyond school looks like. PBL teaches kids how to learn, not what to learn.

Terada, Youki. "Boosting Student Engagement Through Project-Based Learning." Edutopia, 12 June 2018, https://www.edutopia.org/article/boosting-student-engagement- through-project-based-learning.

Helping Teens with Time Management by Marianne McGuire

Do you find that you struggle with getting your teen to complete all of his or her responsibilities? Time management is a skill that many teens struggle with. Those teens who are in tune to their needs and expectations can self monitor their sense of time and make adjustments as needed. Kids that are more uncertain about their needs and expectations have a more difficult time keeping organized, meeting deadlines, planning ahead and establishing routines. The following article explains the advantages of having strong time management skills and the strategies parents can use to help their teens stay on task. By using these simple strategies parents will find that their teens are more productive and less stressed when it comes to getting things done.

How to Teach Time Management Skills to Teens

Math for 2018-2019 by Eric Skrzypchak

If you have been confused on how to understand the Aleks progress report weekly emails, I have good news. An explanation was shared with you through Infinite Campus on how to read and maneuver through Aleks and look at the reports. In case you missed it, here is a link to the explanation. Hopefully, this helps to explain some of the things you can look for and how to navigate through Aleks. Please let me or your son/daughters advisor know if you have any questions or concerns about their math. We have been implementing a new program on Monday’s to help increase our students discourse about math. This new program is Discovery Education and we will be increasing our discourse as a whole group and talking about math more consistently. I will be modeling this with our students through my seminars. Just a reminder that your son/daughter(s) need to be working for a minimum of 45 minutes and mastering 4-6 topics per day. This is three hours and 16-24 topics for the week.

English Seminars by Stephanie Davis

As you know, this year we implemented a new schedule that included more time for teacher

led projects. Things have been going very well in English Seminar and I am excited to be starting new units in each group this month. Our 7th and 8th Grade students have started reading the book Wonder by R.J Palacio. During this seminar we are exploring topics of bullying, peer pressure, fitting in, and kindness. At the end of the unit the students will be using what they have learned from the book and other sources to produces a documentary on one of those topics as well as completing an art project.

Our 9th-10th Grade Group has begun a unit exploring how society shapes and influences individuals. As part of this unit, students will be reading the classic, To Kill a Mockingbird and will be researching the Jim Crow South. Throughout the book Atticus Finch stands up for what he believes even though others disagree. Students will be asked to consider their own beliefs. We will use the NPR program “This I Believe” as inspiration for narrative pieces about one belief they have that will be included in their year long Book Project started during Block 1.

The 10th-11th grade group is exploring the Roaring Twenties and reading The Great Gatsby. We will be exploring the literary elements used by Fitzgerald and what effect they have on the reader. Additionally, students will compare Fitzgerald’s original work to Baz Luhrmann’s modern interpretation and analyze the lyrics from the movie soundtrack as well as explore the soundtrack’s fusion of jazz and hip hop.

The 11th-12th grade group is working on a unit that allows them to explore English Language Arts through music. We started by looking at the arguments for and against Bob Dylan receiving the Nobel Prize in Literature and compared the works of Dylan to the poetry of Allen Ginsberg, a beat poet. Next students will look at the rise of “girl groups” in the 60s and decide if they were voices of empowerment or the reflection of traditional female roles. Later in the unit students will learn about heavy metal and the 80s controversy over parental advisories and how rap and hip hop of the 90s was a response to social and political conditions.

Last but not least, Stephanie and Annie have started a Literacy Strategies seminar to help students build their reading skills as they work toward proficiency. This seminar meets once a week and is open to any student wishing to earn additional English credit and build their skills in the process. In the first unit of this seminar, students will read six articles that help them answer the essential question, “What can we do to improve society?” At the end of the unit they will write an argumentative essay using evidence from multiple texts.

Counselor’s Corner by Heidi McGraw

32 TAGOS students participated in the Charter School Community Career Fair on 12/7/18. Students had the option of listening to 4 different companies within 2 career clusters. The companies that donated their time to help our students learn about different career paths were:

  • Aptiv Inc.
  • Bliss Communication
  • CCI Systems
  • Corporate Contractors, Inc. (CCI)
  • CSL Plasma
  • Grainger
  • Mercyhealth
  • Rock County
  • Wisconsin Laborers

If you have a student that is a SENIOR please make sure their FAFSA (Free Application For Student Aid) is completed at https://studentaid.ed.gov/sa/fafsa. Your senior should also be applying to colleges if that is the path they are choosing. If you need help or have any questions, please contact Heidi McGraw at hmcgraw@janesville.k12.wi.us

Attendance is important….WHY????

The attendance rate is important because students are more likely to succeed in academics when they attend school consistently. It’s difficult for the teacher and the student to build their skills and progress if the student are frequently absent. In addition to falling behind in academics, students who are not in school on a regular basis are more likely to get into trouble with the law and cause problems in their communities. Please try to limit the number of appointments that are scheduled during the school hours. Encourage your student to attend school EVERYDAY!

TAGOS Attendance Policy

Excused Absences (Parent Excused no Doctor’s Note)

  • 5 absences
    • Advisor calls home to inform parent they have used ½ of their total excused days
    • Building Secretary sends letter home
  • 8 absences
    • Advisor calls home to inform parent they have 2 remaining
  • 10 absences
    • Attendance meeting with Parent, Student, Advisor, & Dean
    • Attendance contract

Unexcused Absences (U* & U60**)

Advisor and Dean are notified-consequence may be given for all unexcused absences

  • 1 absences
    • Advisor calls home
  • 5 absences
    • Attendance meeting with Parent, Student, Advisor, & Dean
    • Letter given notifying parents 5 more days = ticket
    • Attendance contract
  • 8 absences
    • Building Secretary sends letter home notifying parents 2 more days = ticket
  • 10 absences
    • Ticket is issued
    • Attendance meeting with Parent, Student, Advisor, & Dean
    • Attendance contract revisited
  • 15 absences
    • Process is started for student to return to their home school or apply to an alternate charter option
  • 20 absences
    • Ticket is issued

Consequences for any unexcused absence can include one or more of the following:

  • Call home from Advisor or Dean
  • Parent Meeting
  • Closed Campus lunch
  • Stay after school 3-3:30
  • In School Suspension
  • Revocation of Experience Day Privilege
  • Home Visits
  • Contract Revisions
  • Student Ticket
  • Parent Ticket

*U=Unexcused Absences (no call, truant, etc.)

**U60=Students are allowed 10 parent excused days any missed time above and beyond that is unexcused even if a parent calls to report the absence.  The exception to this is a doctor’s note which is always an excused absence.

Holiday Spirit Week!!!

  • Tuesday --- Pajamas and fun socks
  • Wednesday --- Advisory Spirit Day
  • Thursday --- Awkward Family Photo & Advisory White Elephant

 

Friday Afternoon Holiday Extravaganza!

  • Dress as your favorite Holiday character
  • Potluck
  • Holiday Movie
  • Reindeer Hunt

Community Leaders WANTED!!

  • Offer Real-World Connection
  • Get involved in student projects, including sitting in on their presentations
  • Share your passion, interests, and career/company with students
  • Contact phernandez@janesville.k12.wi.us for more info

Bus Tokens

TAGOS Leadership Academy has bus tokens for students to purchase. The tokens are .75 each, and can be purchased at the front desk, at 2:30pm. They are sold in amounts of ten tokens per purchase. If you have questions, please call, Valerie Maxon 608-290-0468.

Winter Break

  • Last Day of School Friday December 21st
  • School Resumes Wednesday January 2nd
  • Happy Holidays!

Contact Information:

1350 N. Parker Dr. Janesville, WI
608-290-0468

Principal: Patty Hernandez 743-5059
phernandez@janesville.k12.wi.us

Dean of Students:
Stephanie Davis 289-0293
sldavis@janesville.k12.wi.us

Social Studies Advisor
Kim Helgestad
khelgestad@janesville.k12.wi.us

Math Advisor
Eric Skrzypchak
eskrzypchak@janesville.k12.wi.us

Special Education Advisor
Marianne McGuire
mmcguire@janesville.k12.wi.us

Educational Support
Melissa Aegerter
maegerter@janesville.k12.wi.us
Annie Showers-Curtis
anne.showerscurtis@janesville.k12.wi.us

Student Service Specialist
Heidi McGraw
hmcgraw@janesville.k12.wi.us

Administrative Assistant: 
Valerie Maxon 290-0468
vmaxon@janesville.k12.wi.us

 

October 2018

Tagos Leadership Academy

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Inside this Issue

  • Attendance Goals

  • Reporting an Absence

  • Gold Standard PBL

  • The Live Resource

  • Math

  • Manufacturing Day

  • Student Writing

  • Creative Writing

  • Nature Writing

  • Attendance Policy

  • 8 Ways to Have More Time

  • Child Find

  • Special Ed Referral

Important Dates

  • November 1st Blackhawk Technical College Visit

  • November 8th UW Whitewater Rep

  • November 14th TLA Project Night 6-8

  • November 16th Boulders Climbing Gym

  • November 20th Governance Board 6-7

  • November 21-23 No School

Principal’s Message by Patricia Hernandez

Happy Fall TAGOS Families!
Can you believe we are already done with one quarter of the school year? Time flies when you’re having fun. As your principal I would like you to know that our school has three very important goals this year:

  1. TAGOS will increase the percent of students at/above grade-level lexile band from 73% (spring 2018) to 75% (spring 2019).

  2. TAGOS will increase the percent of students at/above Pathway to Proficiency in math from 18% (spring 2018) to 24% (spring 2019).

  3. TAGOS will decrease the percent of students absent 9-19 days from 36% (spring 2018) to 26% (Spring 2019) and decrease the percent of students absent 20 or more days from 21% (spring 2018) to 11% (spring 2019).

Reading Goal

Literacy is so important. Being literate will help your child fill out college, career, and military applications. Did you know that a student who reads just 20 minutes a day will read 3600 minutes in a school year? That’s about 1,800,000 words. This behavior alone would put a student at the 90th percentile of their peers. Reading five minutes a day results in 900 minutes a school year, 282,000 words and the 50th percentile. We have silent reading daily at TAGOS. Please encourage your child to read. Read anything: magazines, story books, comics, academic books, newspaper, novels ….

Math Goal

Today, critical thinking, problem solving, reasoning ability, and the ability to communicate mathematically are essential skills. These processes are the foundation of mathematics at TAGOS. I want to encourage you to engage your child in thinking and talking about mathematics at home. The latest research on mathematics shows that mistakes are a very important part of learning math. When a person makes an error and they have the opportunity to learn from it, they actually develop a much stronger understanding. In fact, the research states that students learn more from making mistakes than from getting all the right answers. Many of our students have anxiety when working through mathematical concepts. Please reach out to Eric and talk to him about how you could help your child even more.

Attendance Goal

Attendance is essential to academic success. Just two missed school days per month equals eighteen missed days per year. That’s almost a month of school. A child who misses two absences a month are five times more likely to fall behind in reading, writing, and math. Even if the absences are excused, the learning that is missed, doesn’t care. When a child is in school every day they can stay on track, keep up with their peers, and graduate college and career ready. While some absences may be unavoidable, limiting your child’s absences puts them on the path to future academic success and success in life.

These goals are so important to our school, our students, our families, and our staff. Please take the time to talk to your child about the academic progress they are making in regards to these three goals. We can always do better. I will update you on our progress we are making on these three goals in January. Reach out to me if you have any questions.

Best regards,

Patty Hernandez

 

Reporting a Student Absent

They are several ways to report your student as being absent

  1. Call 608-290-0468 This is our main number

  2. You can email Valerie Maxon at vmaxon@janesville.k12.wi.us

  3. Text messages. Please include your name, the name of your student. Along with the reason why your student will be absent that day

  4. If you email your student’s advisor, please include Valerie Maxon on the email.

Reasons why your student should stay home or be sent home:

  • Fever of 100 or higher

  • Vomiting in the last 12 hrs

  • Eyes are stuck shut and are red, oozing, yellow or green

  • Diarrhea

  • Swollen glands, sore throat, continuous coughing lack of energy and a headache

  • A rash WITH another symptom ie, fever, itching, vomiting and low energy

If your student wants to go home during the day, they should have a staff member, or preferably

Valerie Maxon, call home. If a student calls home to request permission to leave, it will be recorded as Parent Excused. If they are sent home by staff for any of the above symptoms, it will be medically excused.

Gold Standard PBL by Stephanie Davis

The purpose of Project Based Learning is to engage and empower learners with hands-on, real world learning experiences.  However, a “project” is not project based learning. Project Based Learning happens across the curriculum, is focused on standards, and seeks to answer a problem or big question, it is not creating a product at the end of a unit of study, it IS the unit of study.  PBL is student driven so students have a lot of voice and choice in their learning. Below is a list of 8 Essential Project Design Elements for Gold Standard PBL from the Buck Institute:

Key Knowledge, Understanding, and Success Skills--The project is focused on student learning goals,  including standards-based content and skills such as critical thinking/problem solving, communication, self-management, and collaboration.

Challenging Problem or Question--The project is framed by a meaningful problem to solve or a question to answer, at the appropriate level of challenge.  

Sustained Inquiry--Students engage in a rigorous extended process of asking questions, finding resources, and applying information.

Authenticity--The project features real-world context, tasks and tools, quality standards, or impact-or speaks to students’ personal concerns, interests, and issues in their lives.

Student Voice & Choice--Students make some decisions about the project, including how they work and what they create.

Reflection--Students and teachers reflect on learning, the effectiveness of their inquiry and project activities, the quality of student work, obstacles, and how to overcome them.

Critique & Revision--Students give, receive, and use feedback to improve their process and products.

Public Product--Students make their project work public by explaining, displaying, and/or presenting it to people beyond the classroom.

For a more in depth look at Gold Standard PBL please go to this link: Gold Standard PBL

Project Night

Please join us November 14th from 6-8pm for Project Night.  Attendees will learn about Project Based Learning, hear from our students about what makes TAGOS special, watch student presentations, and view student project work.

The Live Resource by Marianne McGuire

Over the past 2 months, students have been working hard to complete well researched projects.  One component of the project process that has not received a lot of attention in the past is the “live resource”.  A live resource is someone that the student can contact that is an expert in the subject the student is studying. Throughout this first block, the students were taught where to find a live resource and how to contact them through professional correspondence.  Several students have had a favorable response after contacting a live resource and it has really brought their projects to life. A live resource can be someone who is an expert in a given field of study, someone who is employed in the community, or someone who has had a unique experience related to the topic being explored.  Currently, TAGOS is looking for people who would be willing to serve as live resources for students. If you are interested or if you have something you would love to share with students please contact the staff at TAGOS for more information.

Invite your family and friends to Project Night

November 14th 6-8PM

 

TAGOS Board Needs You!

Become Involved.

We need community members to make

TAGOS Leadership Academy

the best it can be

Get your voice heard. It’s rewarding.

it’s important, and it will make a difference.

Contact Jessica Davis at jessica7554@sbcglobal.net for more information

 

Bus Tokens

TAGOS Leadership Academy has bus tokens for students to purchase. The tokens are

.75 each, and can be purchased at the front desk, at 2:30pm. They are sold in amounts

of ten tokens per purchase. If you have questions, please call, Valerie Maxon

608-290-0468.

 

Math: Eric Skrzypchak

 

Parents and guardians we need your help.  Make sure your son/daughter is achieving to the best of their ability in math.  It may not be their strongest area, but it is an area that they can continue to learn and grow.  They need to be consistent in mastering 4-6 topics per day and working for a minimum of 45 minutes per day.  If they are not meeting these expectations they are more than welcome to do some work before school, lunch, after school, or at home.  Also, if they are struggling they need to ask questions and we will continue to provide support, work through examples, and increase our math discourse or discussions.  If they write examples out and are able to explain things they are more likely to remember it. We are striving to have each student be the most successful that they can be.  

 

Community Leaders WANTED!!

  • Offer Real-World Connection

  • Get involved in student projects, including sitting

  • in on their presentations

  • Share your passion, interests, and career/

  • company with students

  • Contact phernandez@janesville.k12.wi.us for more information

Manufacturing Day: Eric Skrzypchak

Manufacturing Day was Friday, Oct. 5th and was a great success!  We visited GOEX, BTC Advanced Technology Campus, and Frito Lay. We had 22 students attend and they got to hear about and see current jobs in the manufacturing field.  This included jobs of people working in the factories, as well as, marketing, IT and programmers, business management, engineers, and sales. They also heard about school being important, but just as important are the soft skills of showing up daily and on time, willing to learn, and reading safety material and expectations for your interview (First impression means a lot!).

 

Featured Student Writing: Moon Journal Selections by Sam Baierl

Moon journal 10/13/18

Finally! I got a glimpse of the moon tonight! It was only for a moment before it hid behind the clouds again, but it’ll be back. I wonder if it’s aware I’m trying to observe it? Oh well, it was a small sliver of light and rock, not much to off on. I’m just lucky I saw it on my way home from work. Especially since soon after the wispy clouds were called over to shield it once more. The sky felt so big at that time, I felt so small, but in a good way? The vastness of the skyline was also amazing, I felt like it went on forever, and with it, so could I.

Moon journal 10/18/18

Inky blackness,

my home of emptiness,

solitude is my only existence,

deep deep cold

and a story yet to be told,

Waiting for someone to be so bold.

vastness is my greatest allure,

my punishment of reflection filled up with gore,

Don't wait up, no don't wait at all.

Don't expect me to return such loud desperate calls

I can't hear a thing in these obsidian surroundings,

and never will again, until you come to find me.

 

TAGOS Leadership Academy is now accepting applications. Please share the link below with any families you feel may benefit from TAGOS.

Apply Today!

Fundraising Help Needed

Our Governance Board needs YOUR help with fundraising. The Board is looking to work with a group of parent volunteers to plan and organize all upcoming and future fundraising activities. If you would like to help, please fill out this form!

Update on Creative Writing by Annie Showers-Curtis

‘Tis the season! The air is crisp, the leaves are changing, the rich aroma of pumpkin spice is slinking through the air, and the students of the TAGOS Leadership Academy Creative Writing seminars are crafting spooky stories! Over the past few weeks, students have been challenged to reach deep into the recesses of their minds to bring forth stories for the Halloween season. Among the slew stories, we’ve seen what happens when a group of kids want to play Ghosts in the Graveyard, the story of a ghost who stalks a bride in the weeks before her wedding, and the amusing tale of a herd of vegetarian zombies descending upon a California Farmer’s Market.

 

During the writing and revising of these fantastic fictions, we’ve done some in-seminar activities in order to enhance the content of the students’ stories. First, we looked at a list of 50 spooky writing prompts. Some students chose one (or more) of these prompts on which to base their stories, and some students created a concept from scratch. Then they had one week in which to complete a first draft. We spent the next session swapping stories in a peer review workshop where students got feedback from their peers by using the deep-thinking questions from the top section of this Peer Review Worksheet. Students then revised their writing based on the feedback received, turned in both drafts, and are awaiting feedback from me. Students will have the opportunity to revise one more time after reading my feedback.

As I mentioned in September’s newsletter, Creative Writing’s main goal this year is to release a publication of student writing at the end of the year. In the weeks ahead, Creative Writing will serve as a writing workshop. Students will select a piece of their writing that they want to revise and polish in order to make it publication-ready. This can be their spooky story, something from one of our other writing prompts, something written outside of seminar, or something brand new. My goal is to work individually with all students in the workshop environment in order to give each piece the focused attention needed to turn a good piece into a great piece.  

Update on Nature Writing by Annie Showers-Curtis

We are just finishing up our Journaling unit in Nature Writing. So far, we’ve discussed descriptive detail, figurative language, and personification. To take a closer look at each of these forms in seminar, we read a selection from The Journals of Dorothy Wordsworth, identified instances of each form, and discussed them. After the activity, students used seminar time to include each form in their own writing. In addition to in-session writing, students have been assigned writing prompts for at-home journaling which they are encouraged to share in-session.

For the remainder of our Journaling unit, we are observing the moon for an entire lunar cycle (October 8 - November 7). Each night, students are expected to look into the sky and record what they see. They can write standard journal entries, as Dorothy Wordsworth did, or they can write poems or short stories based on what they see. As a part of the moon journaling segment, students will participate in a research studio surrounding the folklore, myths, and legends of the moon. In seminar, we will discuss various cultures’ depictions of the moon, and students will choose a specific piece of folklore, myth, or legend to research and discuss with the group the following week.

At the end of the moon journaling segment, our poetry unit will begin. We will read poems from a wide selection of authors and experiment with different poetic forms. Students will participate in activities and writing prompts meant to deepen their understanding of poetry and further challenge their writing skills.

TAGOS Attendance Policy

Excused Absences

  • 5 absences

    • Advisor calls home to inform parent they have used ½ of their total excused days

    • Building Secretary sends letter home

  • 8 absences

    • Advisor calls home to inform parent they have 2 remaining

  • 10 absences

  • Attendance meeting with Parent, Student, Advisor, & Dean

  • Attendance contract

Unexcused Absences (U* & U60**)

Advisor and Dean are notified-consequence may be given for all unexcused absences

  • 1 absences

    • Advisor calls home

  • 5 absences

    • Attendance meeting with Parent, Student, Advisor, & Dean

    • Letter given notifying parents 5 more days = ticket

    • Attendance contract

  • 8 absences

    • Building Secretary sends letter home notifying parents 2 more days = ticket

  • 10 absences

    • Ticket is issued

    • Attendance meeting with Parent, Student, Advisor, & Dean

    • Attendance contract revisited

  • 15 absences

    • Process is started for student to return to their home school or apply to an alternate charter option

  • 20 absences

    • Ticket is issued

Consequences for any unexcused absence can include one or more of the following:

  • Call home from Advisor or Dean

  • Parent Meeting

  • Closed Campus lunch

  • Stay after school 3-3:30

  • In School Suspension

  • Revocation of Experience Day Privilege

  • Home Visits

  • Contract Revisions

  • Student Ticket Parent Ticket

*U=Unexcused Absences (no call, truant, etc.)

**U60=Students are allowed 10 parent excused days any missed time above and beyond that is unexcused even if a parent calls to report the absence. The exception to this is a doctor’s note which is always an excused absence.

8 Ways to Have More Time

1. Don’t let other people schedule your life.

Do not say “yes” to every opportunity. Do not feel bad about saying “no.” You know your schedule better than anyone.

2. Decide what’s important and do it first every day.

Life happens and is not always predictable. Choose 1-2 “must complete” tasks and get them done right away.

3. Pay close attention to what makes you happy.

Figure out what you are passionate about and what makes you happy. Create your workaround those things.

4. Stop watching TV.

Rethink your leisure time as a reward for completing your “must complete” tasks.

5. Schedule your breaks and enjoy them.

Commit yourself to working on a specific task without distractions for a set amount of time, then take a short break.

6. Look through your calendar and cancel things you aren’t excited about.

This doesn’t apply to everything, since some commitments cannot be broken. Refer back to Tip #1. Truly think through what you schedule for yourself. Does it make you happy? What benefit does it have in the end?

7. If you keep putting something off, just let it go.

Stop procrastinating! If the task is something that needs to get done, GET IT DONE. If it something you keep deferring to later because it doesn’t need to get done, LET IT GO.

8. Before you go to bed, decide on tomorrow’s most

important action.

Content Adapted From: Chris Guillebeau Blog

Please send feedback and questions to Mrs. Valerie Maxon (vmaxon@janesville.k12.wi.us) with “TAGOS Newsletter” in the email subject line. Thank you.

 

Contact Information

1350 N. Parker Dr. Janesville, WI

608-290-0468

Principal: Patty Hernandez 743-5059

phernandez@janesville.k12.wi.us

Dean of Students: Stephanie Davis 289-0293

sldavis@janesville.k12.wi.us

Social Studies Advisor: Kim Helgestad

khelgestad@janesville.k12.wi.us

Math Advisor: Eric Skrzypchak

eskrzypchak@janesville.k12.wi.us

Special Education Advisor: Marianne McGuire

mmcguire@janesville.k12.wi.us

Educational Support:

Melissa Aegerter

maegerter@janesville.k12.wi.us

Annie Showers-Curtis

anne.showerscurtis@janesville.k12.wi.us

Student Service Specialist: Heidi McGraw

hmcgraw@janesville.k12.wi.us

Administrative Assistant: Valerie Maxon 290-0468

vmaxon@janesville.k12.wi.us



 

School District of Janesville CONFIDENTIALITY OF PERSONALLY IDENTIFIABLE INFORMATION OBTAINED THROUGH CHILD FIND ACTIVITIES

The School District of Janesville is required to locate, identify, and evaluate all children, with disabilities, including children with disabilities attending private schools in the school district, and homeless children. The process of locating, identifying, and evaluating children with disabilities is known as child find. This agency conducts the following child find activities each year in the form of Early Childhood and Speech and Language Developmental Screenings. This notice informs parents of the records the school district will develop and maintain as part of its child find activities. This notice also informs parents of their rights regarding any records developed.

The school district gathers personally identifiable information on any child who participates in child find activities. Parents, teachers, and other professionals provide information to the school related to the child’s academic performance, behavior, and health. This information is used to determine whether the child needs special education services. Personally identifiable information directly related to a child and maintained by the school is a pupil record. Pupil records include records maintained in any way including, but not limited to, computer storage media, video and audiotape, film, microfilm, and microfiche. Records maintained for personal use by a teacher and not available to others and records available only to persons involved in the psychological treatment of a child are not pupil records.

The school district maintains several classes of pupil records.

  • "Progress records" include grades, courses the child has taken, the child's attendance record, immunization records, required lead screening records, and records of school extra-curricular activities. Progress records must be maintained for at least five years after the child ceases to be enrolled.

  • "Behavioral records" include such records as psychological tests, personality evaluations, records of conversations, written statements relating specifically to the pupil's behavior, tests relating specifically to achievement or measurement of ability, physical health records other than immunization and lead screening records, law enforcement officers' records, and other pupil records that are not "progress records." Law enforcement officers' records are maintained separately from other pupil records. Behavioral records may be maintained for no longer than one year after the child graduates or otherwise ceases to be enrolled, unless the parent specifies in writing that the records may be maintained for a longer period of time. The school district informs parents when pupil records are no longer needed to provide special education. At the request of the child's parents, the school district destroys the information that is no longer needed.

  • "Directory data" includes the student's name, address, telephone listing, date and place of birth, major field of study, participation in officially recognized activities and sports, weight and height of members of athletic teams, dates of attendance, photographs, degrees and awards received, and the name of the school most recently previously attended by the student.

  • "Pupil physical health records" include basic health information about a pupil, including the pupil's immunization records, an emergency medical card, a log of first aid and medicine administered to the pupil, an athletic permit card, a record concerning the pupil's ability to participate in an education program, any required lead screening records, the results of any routine screening test, such as for hearing, vision or scoliosis, and any follow-up to the test, and any other basic health information, as determined by the state superintendent. Any pupil record relating to a pupil's physical health that is not a pupil physical health record is treated as a patient health care record under sections 146.81 to 146.84, Wisconsin Statutes. Any pupil record concerning HIV testing is treated as provided under section 252.15, Wisconsin Statutes.

The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA), the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA), and section 118.125, Wisconsin Statutes, afford parents and students over 18 years of age ("eligible students") the following rights with respect to education records:

  • The right to inspect and review the student's education records within 45 days of receipt of the request. Parents or eligible students should submit to the school principal [or appropriate school official] a written request that identifies the records(s) they wish to inspect. The principal will make arrangements for access and notify the parent or eligible student of the time and place where the records may be inspected. The school district will comply with the request without unnecessary delay and before any meeting about an individualized education program, or any due process hearing, and in no case more than 45 days after the request has been made. If any record includes information on more than one child, the parents of those children have the right to inspect and review only the information about their child or to be informed of that specific information. Upon request, the school district will give a parent or eligible student a copy of the progress records and a copy of the behavioral records. Upon request, the school district will give the parent or eligible student a list of the types and locations of education records collected, maintained, or used by the district for special education. The school district will respond to reasonable requests for explanations and interpretations of the records. A representative of the parent may inspect and review the records.

  • The right to request the amendment of the student's education records that the parent or eligible student believes is inaccurate or misleading. Parents or eligible students may ask [Name of] School District to amend a record that they believe is inaccurate or misleading. They should write the school principal, clearly identify the part of the record they want changed, and specify why it is inaccurate or misleading. If the district decides not to amend the record, the district will notify the parent or eligible student of the decision and the right to a hearing regarding the request for amendment. Additional information regarding the hearing procedures will be provided to the parent or eligible student when notified of the right to a hearing.

  • The right to consent to disclosures of personally identifiable information in the student's education records, except to the extent that federal and state law authorize disclosure without consent. The exceptions are stated in 34 CFR 99.31, Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act regulations; Sec. 9528, PL107-110, No Child Left Behind Act of 2001; and section 118.125(2)(a) to (m) and sub. (2m), Wisconsin Statutes. One exception that permits disclosure without consent is disclosures to school officials with legitimate educational interests. A school official is a person employed by the district as an administrator, supervisor, instructor, or support staff member (including health or medical staff and law enforcement unit personnel); a person serving on the school board; a person or company with whom the district has contracted to perform a special task (such as an attorney, auditor, medical consultant, or therapist); or a parent or student serving on an official committee, such as a disciplinary or grievance committee, or assisting another school official in performing his or her tasks. A school official has a legitimate educational interest if the official needs to review an education record in order to fulfill his or her professional responsibility. Upon request, the district discloses education records without consent to officials of another school district in which a student seeks or intends to enroll. Also the district discloses "directory data" without consent, unless the parent notifies the district that it may not be released without prior parental consent.

  • The right to file a complaint with the U. S. Department of Education concerning alleged failures by the District to comply with the requirements of FERPA. The name and address of the Office that administers FERPA is: Family Policy Compliance Office, U.S. Department of Education, 400 Maryland Avenue, S.W., Washington, DC 20202-4605.

SCHOOL DISTRICT OF JANESVILLE ANNUAL NOTICE OF SPECIAL EDUCATION REFERRAL AND EVALUATION PROCEDURES

 

Upon request, the School District of Janesville is required to evaluate a child for eligibility for special education services. A request for evaluation is known as a referral. When the district receives a referral, the district will appoint an Individualized Education Program (IEP) team to determine if the child has a disability, and if the child needs special education services. The district locates, identifies, and evaluates all children with disabilities who are enrolled by their parents in private (including religious) schools, elementary schools and secondary schools located in the school district.

A physician, nurse, psychologist, social worker, or administrator of a social agency who reasonably believes a child brought to him or her for services is a child with a disability has a legal duty to refer the child, including a homeless child, to the school district in which the child resides. Before referring the child, the person making the referral must inform the child's parent that the referral will be made.

Others, including parents, who reasonably believe a child is a child with a disability may also refer the child, including a homeless child, to the school district in which the child resides.

Referrals must be in writing and include the reason why the person believes the child is a child with a disability. A referral may be made by contacting Ms. Kimberli Peerenboom, Director of Pupil Services, School District of Janesville, at 608-743-5061, or by writing her at 527 S. Franklin Street, Janesville, WI, 53548.

September 2018

Tagos Leadership Academy

Facebook

Twitter

Inside this Issue

  • Teacher Led Projects

  • What is PBL Anyhow?

  • Attendance

  • Counselor’s Corner

  • Bus Tokens

  • Goal Setting

  • Supplies Needed

  • Math

  • Manufacturing Day

  • Creative Writing & Nature Writing

  • Child Find Notice

 

Important Dates

  • September 21st 3rd Friday Count

  • October 5th Manufacturing Day

  • October 16th Governance Board Meeting 6:30

  • October 17th UWW Out Reach Dance your Story

  • October 18th Makeup Picture Day

  • October 23rd Student Presents to BOE

  • October 24th No School Student Led Conferences

  • October 25th JPAC Performance

  • October 25th No School Student Led Conferences

  • October 26th No School

Principal’s Message by Patricia Hernandez

It is hard to believe that we have already been in school for Three weeks! Our students have come in ready to learn and we have settled into the daily routines. We are off to a fantastic start!

This TAGOS Newsletter will be published every month. Look for it to come into your inbox toward the latter part of every month. I know that you want to be aware of all of our school events - reading this newsletter will keep you in the loop. You can also access the newsletter on the TAGOS webpage, at https://www.tagosleadershipacademy.org/news. Our school calendar is found here: https://www.tagosleadershipacademy.org/calendar. In addition, I encourage you to ‘like’ the TAGOS Facebook page. We post pictures of some of the activities and events that are happening at our wonderful school. It’s a way for you to see parts of our dynamic program when you cannot be on campus.

We are still in need of mentors for our seniors. We want our seniors to have the best experiences and graduate college and career ready. Students need positive relationships with caring adults. Think about how you could inspire a student and help them along their journey. Please consider sharing this need with the company you work for. Here are a few reasons why we want our students to have a mentor:

  • Students know they matter

  • Helps students stay in school, minimizes absences

  • Improves the student’s self-esteem

  • Teaches students how to relate and communicate better with others

  • Helps kids set career goals and take steps to realize them

  • Students are less likely to be involved in risky behavior

Sign up to be a mentor here. Feel free to contact me with any questions or concerns at 608-921-3990 or phernandez@janesville.k12.wi.us.

Your principal,

Patty Hernandez

 

Teacher Led Projects by Stephanie Davis

This year we implemented a new schedule that included more time for teacher led projects. Students have been divided into grade level groups and rotate to each advisor three days a week. The new schedule seems to be working well and it definitely helps the days go by faster according to several students. Right now Kim is focusing on finding primary and secondary sources. Marianne is guiding students through the project process and helping students develop deeper questions by connecting them to Bloom’s taxonomy. Eric is working with students on their Aleks math and incorporating lessons from Discovery Ed. Eric also leads the Financial Literacy Seminar. In this seminar, students learn about financial responsibility and hear from many guest speakers from local banks and businesses. In Stephanie's seminar, students are working on “The Book Project-Who am I?” and learning about narrative writing and memoirs. The students are reading memoirs written by authors of many different cultures. Each student will write their own memoir and develop a complete book. Students will present an excerpt from their book and discuss their writing process at an upcoming Project Night. Annie is leading two seminars that students may choose to join, Nature Writing and Creative Writing. These seminars are a big hit and participation is so high that Annie had to open up a second section of Creative Writing. As we head into the end of the month JPAC seminars will begin again. Jim McCullough from the Janesville Performing Arts Center will be working with students twice a week to develop their acting skills. The seminar will culminate in a performance at JPAC on October 23rd. This year we also welcome back Kassi Alfredson from Community Action for the PREP Seminar. PREP stands for Personal Responsibility Education Program and students who choose to join this seminar learn about “building healthy relationships, education about reproductive healthcare, understanding financial literacy, and increasing self-efficacy” (https://community-action.org/health/prep/). The seminar finishes with a college visit as well. We are so excited for all the great activities this year has in store for our students.

 

What is PBL Anyhow? by Stephanie Davis

It seems as though these days there is an acronym for everything. The name of our school is even an acronym (Tailoring Academics to Guide Our Students)! PBL can stand for many things including Problem Based Learning, Place Based Learning, or in our case, Project Based Learning. But what exactly does that mean? Teachers may have heard those buzz words, and maybe they are even trying to incorporate PBL into their teaching repertoire by adding a “project” to the end of their traditional lesson. This is not Project Based Learning. PBL is not a product tacked on to the end of a unit. It is deep meaningful research done over an extended period of time where students are attempting to answer an authentic challenging question or problem that culminates in a public presentation. According to the Buck Institute, “Project Based Learning is a teaching method in which students gain knowledge and skills by working for an extended period of time to investigate and respond to an authentic, engaging, and complex question, problem, or challenge” (The Buck Institute). In PBL, learning is a journey that crosses subject areas and engages students to think big. “If you are interested in learning more about PBL, check out the article “What the Heck is Project-Based Learning?” for a great plain language explanation.

 

Attendance by Stephanie Davis

Did you know that September is Attendance Awareness Month? Attendance is very important for your child’s education and your child’s future. Research shows that students who attend regularly have higher academic achievement and if a student is chronically absent, they miss out on instruction which causes them to fall behind in school. To help support good attendance, TAGOS has implemented a new attendance policy. Please read through it carefully and help support your child’s education by emphasizing good attendance. We understand that at times it is wise to keep your child home from school, however, things that do NOT require staying home include: the common cold, a cough that is not associated with an infectious disease (such as whooping cough), a fever of 101 or lower. If your child is sick please call the school at 608-290-0468 by 8:30 am.

 

Counselor’s Corner by Heidi McGraw

 

Chronic absence has historically been an alarming, largely overlooked problem that is preventing too many children from having an opportunity to learn and succeed. New national data collected for the 2015-16 school year finds that 8 million students are chronically absent. National data collected for the 2013-14 school year found one out of seven students were chronically absent. This is not just a problem in middle and high school: It starts in kindergarten and preschool. It is a problem in districts of every size, urban, suburban and rural.

 

The good news is chronic absence is a problem we can fix when schools and communities work with students and families, starting in the early grades, to identify barriers to getting to school, help students overcome these barriers, and cultivate a culture of attendance that encourages showing up every day even when it isn’t easy. This starts by helping everyone in the community recognize they have a stake and a role. It requires careful attention to data and strategic, locally tailored interventions to address attendance challenges as soon as chronic absence emerges a problem.

 

This PBS NewsHour video segment, “Empty Chairs” illustrates what is possible. It showcases how the Cleveland Metropolitan School District is making a difference through its positive, problem-solving approach that engages families and students and leverages the power of engaging the entire community. (http://awareness.attendanceworks.org/resources/count-us-toolkit-2018/)

SEPTEMBER IS ATTENDANCE AWARENESS MONTH!! ATTEND TODAY, ACHIEVE TOMORROW

September 21, 2018 is 3rd Friday Count

 

Bus Tokens

TAGOS Leadership Academy has bus tokens for students to purchase. The tokens are

.75 each, and can be purchased at the front desk, at 2:30pm. They are sold in amounts

of ten tokens per purchase. If you have questions, please call 608-290-0468.

 

Goal Setting by Marianne McGuire

Goal setting is an important step in helping students achieve success. Goal setting creates a

purpose, increases focus, motivation and improves one’s overall performance. Goal setting

teaches time management and clarifies the outcomes when making decisions. A Harvard

research study on goal setting has documented that people who have goals and write them

down are 10 times more successful than people who do not have goals. Thus, the following

link is a quick article that will give parents ideas on how to help your child set goals for both

school and home.

Helping Kids be Goal Setters


 

TAGOS Leadership Academy is now accepting applications.

Please share the link below with any families you feel may benefit from TAGOS.

Apply Today!

 

Supplies Needed to Support Student Volunteers by Kim Helgestad

TAGOS Students are volunteering their time to assist NAMI Rock County in preparing for their annual "Paint the Town Yellow 5K Run/Walk" for Mental Health and Suicide Awareness. Students have been tasked with making motivational and mental health/suicide awareness posters to be displayed along the race route. They have also been tasked with making tutus for some of the child and adult participants. TAGOS is in need of the following supplies to be donated. Supplies can be dropped off at TAGOS Leadership Academy by Wednesday, September 26th. Thank you for your support!

  • 1/2"-Wide Elastic

  • Yellow Tulle

 

Math 2018-2019 by Eric Skrzypchak

Math for 2018-2019. We will continue to use Aleks for math, but we will be implementing a new program to help increase our students discourse about math. This new program is Discovery Education and we will be increasing our discourse as a whole group and talking about math more consistently. I will be modeling this with our students through my seminars.

 

Manufacturing Day by Eric Skrzypchak

We will be visiting GOEX of Janesville, Blackhawk Technical College Advanced Manufacturing Training Center (Milton Campus), and Frito Lay of Beloit. Students will be exposed to some of the many career opportunities offered through modern day manufacturing. They will have an opportunity to ask questions about job security and growth as a qualified candidate. Lastly, they will learn about opportunities to start taking college courses while they are in high school.

 

TAGOS Board Needs You!

Become Involved.

We need community members to make TAGOS Leadership Academy the best it can be.

Get your voice heard. It’s rewarding.  It’s important, and it will make a difference.

Contact Jessica Davis at jessica7554@sbcglobal.net for more information


Creative Writing and Nature Writing by Annie Showers-Curtis

Last year, I led a Creative Writing Club that consisted of about twelve students. This year, offered as a seminar, twenty-nine students signed up for Creative Writing. Because of the high number of interested students, this seminar has been split into two groups. Our main focus this year is creating a publication of student work to be printed by a local company. Throughout the year, students will submit writing pieces to be included in the publication, and as a group, we will workshop to revise each student’s writing. Like last year, we will also do in-session writing activities such as found poetry, creative writing prompts and activities, and journaling.

A new seminar that I’m offering this year is Nature Writing. In Nature Writing, we are going to read and write about nature in four different disciplines: journaling, poetry, fiction, and essay. As we read and write in each of these areas, we will have in-session discussions on what we’ve read, what we’ve written, and how we can add new and deeper themes to our writing. A lot of our writing time (while weather permits) will be done outside, and students will be encouraged to spend more time with nature outside of our seminar. And, though this seminar’s main focus is nature writing, we will also branch out and do some nature art projects as well!

throughout the year, I will offer updates on each seminar, and showcase a piece of student writing in the TAGOS newsletter. I’m looking forward to reading all of our students’ writing this year, and I hope you are, as well!


 

Fundraising Help Needed

Our Governance Board needs YOUR help with fundraising. The Board is looking to work with a group of parent volunteers to plan and organize all upcoming and future fundraising activities. If you would like to help, please fill out this form!

 

Community Leaders Wanted!!

Offer Real-World Connection

Get involved in student projects, including sitting in on their presentations

Share your passion, interests, and career/company with students

Contact phernandez@janesville.k12.wi.us for more information

 

Child Find Notice

The school district must locate, identify and evaluate all resident children with disabilities, including children with disabilities attending private schools, regardless of the severity of their disabilities.” The school district has a special education program to locate and screen all children with suspected disabilities who are residents of the district and who have not graduated from high school. Upon request the school district will screen any resident child who has not graduated high school to determine whether a special education referral is appropriate. A request may be made by contacting Kim-berli Peerenboom, Director of Pupil Services for the School District of Janesville at 743-5061, or by writing her at 527 S. Franklin St., Janesville WI 53548.

Annually the district conducts developmental screening of pre-school children. Each child’s motor, communication and social skills are observed at various play areas. Each child is weighed and measured, and the child’s hearing and vision is checked. The information is used to provide the parent with a profile of their child’s current development and to provide suggestions for follow up activities. Parents learn about community services available to them and speak with representatives of agencies serving families. The information from screening is also used to determine whether a child should be evaluated for a suspected disability. When school staff reasonably believe a child is a child with a disability, they refer the child for evaluation by a school district Individualized Education Program (IEP) team. Developmental screening will be a part of the kindergarten screening this Spring. Watch for dates at your local school.

A physician, nurse, psychologist, social worker or administrator of a social agency who reasonably believes a child brought to him or her for services is a child with a disability has a legal duty to report the child to the school district in which the child resides. Before referring the child, the person making the referral must inform the child’s parents that the referral will be made. The referral must be in writing and include the reason why the person believes the child is a child with a disability. Others who reasonably believe a child is a child with a disability may also refer the child to the school district in which the child resides. A referral of a child residing in the School District of Janesville may be sent to Kimberli

Peerenboom at the school district address above.”

Please send feedback and questions to Mrs. Valerie Maxon (vmaxon@janesville.k12.wi.us) with “TAGOS Newsletter” in the email subject line. Thank you.

 

Contact Information

1350 N. Parker Dr. Janesville, WI

608-290-0468

Principal: Patty Hernandez 743-5059

phernandez@janesville.k12.wi.us

Dean of Students: Stephanie Davis 289-0293

sldavis@janesville.k12.wi.us

Social Studies Advisor: Kim Helgestad

khelgestad@janesville.k12.wi.us

Math Advisor: Eric Skrzypchak

eskrzypchak@janesville.k12.wi.us

Special Education Advisor: Marianne McGuire

mmcguire@janesville.k12.wi.us

Educational Support:

Melissa Aegerter

maegerter@janesville.k12.wi.us

Annie Showers-Curtis

anne.showerscurtis@janesville.k12.wi.us

Student Service Specialist: Heidi McGraw

hmcgraw@janesville.k12.wi.us

Administrative Assistant: Valerie Maxon 290-0468

vmaxon@janesville.k12.wi.us

August 2018

Tagos Leadership Academy

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Inside this Issue

  • School Supply List
  • 8 Strategies for Success
  • Thinking Ahead
  • Math and Discovery Education
  • Becoming a Mentor
  • 10 Reasons Why Mentoring Works
  • Free Books
  • Child Find Notice
  • Contact Information

 

Important Dates

  • August 29th Parent Orientation 6:00 at TAGOS
  • September 4th & 5th PBL Boot Camp 8-11:30.  New Students Only
  • September 4th & 5th Goal Setting Conferences 12:30-6:00
  • September 6th First Day of School
  • September 7th Picture Day
  • TAGOS T-Shirts on sale NOW for $7.00

Principal’s Message by Patricia Hernandez

Welcome back TAGOS families!!

For many of you, it is a warm welcome back to TAGOS Leadership Academy, for other families, it is a brand new educational journey for your child. One of our biggest goals this year is to help your child feel successful and achieve academic excellence. It is our mission to help every child feel welcomed, connected, and a part of our TAGOS family.

  • TAGOS takes great pride in creating an educational atmosphere where students can learn in a caring and creative environment. Together our staff encourages students to engage in a lifelong love of learning.  As we focus on student achievement we will provide a variety of academic and educational experiences that promote student growth and learning throughout the year. During the upcoming school year I encourage you to take an active role in your child’s learning. Parent involvement plays a critical role in our school’s success. Ways to support and increase your child’s academic success include:
  • Make attendance a priority including limiting tardiness and absences
  • Communicate often with your child’s advisor via email, phone, or notes
  • Encourage a love for reading
  • Attend school-wide events
  • Celebrate your child’s academic success

Enjoy the remaining days of summer and feel free to contact me with any questions or concerns at 608-921-3990 or phernandez@janesville.k12.wi.us.

Your principal,

Patty Hernandez

Suggested School Supplies

  • 4 Spiral Notebooks
  • 2-3 Folders
  • Pencils and Highlighters
  • 3-4 Binders
  • Calculator  Preferred: Texas Instruments 30XII2
  • Hand Sanitizer
  • Clorox Wipes
  • Tissue

8 Strategies for Success

Hello and welcome back to school all new and returning TAGOS Families!  I hope all of you have had a restful and relaxing summer! As we gear up for the 2018-2019 school, it is important to start the year off right.  Planning and organization can foster school success. With the summer winding down and the anticipation of a new school year about to begin, it is helpful to be reminded of those things that students can do to be ready for a fresh start.  The following link gives students 8 useful tips on being better prepared for the start of a new school year. When going back to school, “don't spin your wheels and stress. Take a deep breath, center yourself and make a plan”--Douglas Adams.  See you all soon!

School Year Success

Thinking Ahead

  1. What would make this year at TAGOS the best year ever?
  2. What will you do to ensure your success this year?
  3. What are you passionate about?
  4. How do you want to be recognized?
  5. What questions do you want to answer through your projects this year?
  6. What is our community in need of?
  7. How can you make a lasting impact on our community?
  8. What academic, social, and personal growth goals will you set for yourself?

Math & Beyond

Welcome back students and parents.  We will again be using Aleks for our math this year.

In conjunction with that I will be incorporating some Discovery Education activities during our math time.  This program is available to every student in the district and Parker and Craig will be using it as well. Discovery Education provides real-world problems through interactive media, visuals, and videos and makes students have conversations about math.  Also, we will be incorporating a hour of code each week to provide students with STEM extensions that help to provide connections with their everyday math.

Become a Mentor

Take a moment to reflect on your educational or career journey. Did you have an inspirational teacher? Or maybe you had a co-worker or a manager who took you under his or her wing and showed you the ropes?

If you were lucky enough to have someone who helped you along the way, then you know firsthand the value of mentoring.

I’d like to encourage the business leaders of Janesville to get involved and be a mentor to one of our TAGOS students. Children need positive relationships with caring adults, according to a study on the benefits of mentoring conducted by the Edna McConnell Clark Foundation.

DOING YOUR PART AS A MENTOR

Be becoming a mentor, you are doing your part to ensure that today’s students have the tools and support they need to succeed. Here are some ways you can help are students as a mentor:

  1. Improve social skills: Make students better leaders by enabling them to relate to different kinds of people. Help them develop strong communication skills so they can handle any situation.
  2. Bolster self-esteem: A mentor is someone who is always in a student’s corner. Be a champion. Believe in a young person. Recognize and celebrate his or her successes.
  3. Provide career exploration: Many mentors act as career counselors, helping students to brainstorm career possibilities, define career goals and establish action plans to reach professional goals. You can also be a great source of networking opportunities for students.
  4. Support academic activities: Depending on the circumstance, you can serve as an important academic tutor during the school year.
  5. Be a friend: Some students, especially the older ones, find it difficult to talk to their parents or friends about what’s on their mind. As a mentor, You can serve as a trusted confidante, helping a student work through day-to-day struggles.

10 Reasons Why Mentoring Works

  1. Mentors help kids stay in school.
  2. Mentors help improve a young person’s self-esteem.
  3. Mentors teach young people how to relate and communicate better with others.
  4. Mentors help kids set career goals and take steps to realize them.
  5. Mentors can stress the importance of education, which can lead to a decrease in absenes.
  6. Young people with mentors are less likely to be involved in risky behavior.
  7. Mentors can engage teens in safe activities during free time.
  8. A mentor serves as a role model, advocate, friend, and advisor.
  9. Amentor is someone who matters in a young person’s life.
  10. A mentor lets a young person know they are someone who matters.

Sign Up Here

BE Someone Who Matters TO Someone Who Matters

Mentoring Works!

 

Community Leaders WANTED!!

  • Offer Real-World Connection
  • Get involved in student projects, including sitting in on their presentations
  • Share your passion, interests, and career/company with students
  • Contact phernandez@janesville.k12.wi.us for more information

Free Books!

Do you have a child age birth-4?  If so, you can sign them up for the United Way Blackhawk Region’s Imagination Library.  Your child(ren) will recieve a free book in the mail every month until (s)he turns 5!

Janesville Early Literacy

Read, Talk & Play Every Day

www.liveunitedbr.org/ImaginationLibraryRegistration

Child Find Notice

The school district must locate, identify and evaluate all resident children with disabilities, including children with disabilities attending private schools, regardless of the severity of their disabilities.” The school district has a special education program to locate and screen all children with suspected disabilities who are residents of the district and who have not graduated from high school. Upon request the school district will screen any resident child who has not graduated high school to determine whether a special education referral is appropriate. A request may be made by contacting Kimberli Peerenboom, Director of Pupil Services for the School District of Janesville at 743-5061, or by writing her at 527 S. Franklin St., Janesville WI 53548.

Annually the district conducts developmental screening of preschool children. Each child’s motor, communication and social skills are observed at various play areas. Each child is weighed and measured, and the child’s hearing and vision is checked. The information is used to provide the parent with a profile of their child’s current development and to provide suggestions for follow up activities. Parents learn about community services available to them and speak with representatives of agencies serving families. The information from screening is also used to determine whether a child should be evaluated for a suspected disability. When school staff reasonably believe a child is a child with a disability, they refer the child for evaluation by a school district Individualized Education Program (IEP) team. Developmental screening will be a part of the kindergarten screening this Spring. Watch for dates at your local school.

A physician, nurse, psychologist, social worker or administrator of a social agency who reasonably believes a child brought to him or her for services is a child with a disability has a legal duty to report the child to the school district in which the child resides. Before referring the child, the person making the referral must inform the child’s parents that the referral will be made. The referral must be in writing and include the reason why the person believes the child is a child with a disability. Others who reasonably believe a child is a child with a disability may also refer the child to the school district in which the child resides. A referral of a child residing in the School District of Janesville may be sent to Kimberli Peerenboom at the school district address above.”

Please send feedback and questions to Mrs. Valerie Maxon (vmaxon@janesville.k12.wi.us) with “TAGOS Newsletter” in the email subject line. Thank you.